Air Quality

Nevada’s Chemical Accident Protection Program

Does your facility need a CAPP permit? If you are a business in Nevada that works with highly hazardous substances such as Ammonia, Chlorine, Mercury, Methane, or others, you might need a permit with the Chemical Accident Prevention Program (CAPP). Administered by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection’s Bureau of Air Pollution Control, CAPP requires two permits for facilities across the state that use highly hazardous substances: a construction permit and an operating permit.CAPP is designed to make sure that facilities with …

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New Air Testing Determination System Effective February 1st

On February 1, 2021, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection’s Air Program announced a new Testing Determination System (TDS). The TDS is a standardized method the Air Program uses to determine air quality operating permit testing requirements based on a facility’s Potential-to-Emit (PTE), operating parameters, and compliance history. Beginning with the initial phase announced on February 1st, the new TDS applies to baghouses controlling non-combustion emission units.  Additional phases for other air pollution controls and emission units are planned for future development.   Implementation …

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State and Local Emissions Inventory System (SLEIS) Annual Emissions Submissions Due April 2, 2021

On February 8, 2021, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) Air Program announced the beginning of the annual emissions reporting season for calendar year 2020. For facilities holding NDEP air quality operating permits, the State and Local Emission Inventory System (SLEIS) has been populated with each facility’s permit information as it existed on December 31, 2020 and the system is ready for data entry. NDEP has extended the deadline for reporting to Friday, April 2, 2021.  When announcing that the …

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Petition to add 1-BP to CAA list of toxics signed

On June 12, 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator signed a final notice to grant a petition to add 1-Bromopropane (1-BP) to the Clean Air Act (CAA) list of air toxics. Once this substance is added, the EPA may revise or create new emission standards for source categories that emit 1-BP.  Use of 1-BP has increased over the past two decades. It is used as a solvent in many industries and products such as aerosol glues, asphalt production, synthetic …

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Clean Air Act 50th Anniversary

For 50 years, the Clean Air Act (CAA) has protected the public health and the environment through the implementation of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) which measure the emissions and pollutants in our air. Since its implementation, emissions and pollutants have dropped by 77%.* In 1990 amendments were implemented, which significantly reduced the concentrations of air pollutants. Below are a few examples of the decrease in emissions for each pollutant. Carbon Monoxide (CO) 8-Hour – decreased by 78% Lead (Pb) 3-Month …

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How Mobile Sources Affect Your Health

Mobile Sources of Air Pollution Mobile sources of air pollution are divided into two categories: On-road vehicles include: Motorcycles; Passenger cars and trucks; and Commercial trucks and buses. Nonroad vehicles and engines include: Aircraft; Heavy equipment; Locomotives; Marine vessels; Recreation vehicles (snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles, etc.); and Small engines and tools (lawnmowers, etc.). Related documents: Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources (PDF) (16 pp, EPA420-B-06-002, February 2006) Provides a list of all compounds emitted by mobile sources in 2006. Expanding and Updating …

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Ground level Ozone Basics

What is “good” vs. “bad” ozone? Ozone can be “good” or “bad” for health and the environment depending on where it’s found in the atmosphere. Stratospheric ozone is “good” because it protects living things from ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Ground-level ozone, the topic of this website, is “bad” because it can trigger a variety of health problems, particularly for children, the elderly, and people of all ages who have lung diseases such as asthma. Learn more about ground-level ozone. Ozone is a gas …

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The Benefits of Reducing Idling

Benefits and Methods for Reducing Idling Operator comfort is essential to maintaining focus and high performance in locomotive shipping.  However, changing how you achieve it by reducing idling can help you achieve significant benefits. Benefits from reducing long-duration idling include: Decreasing fuel costs, Decreasing engine maintenance costs; Extending engine life; Improving operator well-being by decreasing noise levels; Decreasing emissions that are harmful to the environment; and Improving relationships with surrounding communities. There are two ways of reducing idling: Behavioral strategies …

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